Location
Start Dates

  • May 08, 2023
Program Delivery

  • Blended

Open Studies is available only for domestic learners.

See below for application opening dates.

Open Studies Regional

Open Studies offers a variety of introductory courses in business, community studies, health, social sciences, and technology.

Please note that Open Studies is not an independent program and is limited to a selection of entry-level courses. If you are interested in a particular course not listed below, please contact us.

Open Studies Regional allows learners living in the area surrounding Calgary to take College courses to:

  • explore a subject or field before committing to a program
  • get a head start on a program whether it's at Bow Valley College or elsewhere
  • qualify for admission to a Bow Valley College program
  • satisfy a personal interest
  • build your skills
  • experience post-secondary learning

Courses are delivered with a blend of learning activities that are in-class or online. Learners are required to participate in scheduled learning activities and some scheduled exams may be required. 

Campuses in Airdrie, Cochrane, and Okotoks are available to provide in-person services. Contact Regional, or view our locations to contact the campus nearest you and find out more about Regional programming.

 

Related Links


Course Listings Request More Information
Airdrie Campus

(403) 355-1910
bvcairdrie@bowvalleycollege.ca

Cochrane Campus

(403) 851-0463
bvccochrane@bowvalleycollege.ca

Okotoks Campus

(403) 476-2233
bvcokotoks@bowvalleycollege.ca

Strathmore Region

(403) 983-1221
bvcstrathmore@bowvalleycollege.ca


Admissions

Open Studies applicants do not need to meet specific academic requirements of the College, however standard English-language proficiency is recommended.

Application dates:

Term Applications Open
Winter 2023 (January 10 - April 28) September 22, 2022
Spring 2023 (May 8 - August 24) January 23, 2023
Fall 2023 (September 5 - December 20) May 22, 2023

 

How to apply:

Applications for Open Studies Regional are accepted through applyalberta.ca

There is no application fee to apply for Open Studies Regional.

Once your application has been processed, we will email you with the list of courses. Learners registered in Open Studies courses may take a maximum of fifteen credits per term.

Apply early for the best opportunity to choose the courses you want.

Course Listing


Course outlines are available here.

Winter TermCourses are subject to change

Through practice and reflection, learners nuture personal and professional relationships using interpersonal communication skills. With a focus on other-oriented communication, learners demonstrate how inequities and power dynamics influence relationships.

This survey course focuses on understanding the goals and essential components for the development of successful early childhood programs. Through the study of the role of early childhood professionals, students will gain insight into their own philosophy of early childhood education.

This first-year composition course introduces learners to academic writing and critical thinking. They read and analyze sociopolitical, cultural, and gender issues in texts with an emphasis on experiences of people whose voices were historically silenced, particularly those of Indigenous communities in Canada. Learners develop strategies to communicate their own ideas and integrate them with those of others by quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing source material. Learners present their written assignments professionally according to APA formatting guidelines.

The central theme of the course focuses on the relationship between thinking, human behaviour, and organizational effectiveness. Opportunity is provided for learners to experience incidental learning as they evaluate their own behaviour. Learners explore how concepts and ideas pertaining to human behaviour can transform self, relationships, and the workplace.

The focus of this course is on the importance of aligning human resources practices with organizational strategies and employment acts. Learners identify and discuss trends in workplace health and safety. Additionally, the role that the human resources functional processes, practices and programs have in creating an engaged workforce is developed and reflected on.

This course introduces learners to the multifaceted roles of managers within an organization through theory and practical application. While analyzing and critically reflecting on the functions of management, learners have the opportunity to connect key concepts with their own professional practice. Topics such as strategic planning, organizational structure and design, leadership, motivation, controls, and team dynamics are examined.
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to organizations and sustainability articulates a management approach to integrating economic, ethical, and environmental responsibilities into all aspects of organizations working to benefit society. Learners examine ethics of business and constructs of morally appropriate behavior concerning decision-making and businesses' relationship with the community. Concepts and practical approaches are used to discuss and integrate sustainability criteria with business requirements, including performance management and evolving strategies as business needs change.

Spring-Summer TermCourses are subject to change

This comprehensive course introduces the structure of the human body and its relationship to the function and integration of the twelve body systems as well as how they work to maintain homeostasis. Learners will gain an in depth understanding of the organization of the human body from the chemical and cellular level to the tissues, organs and organ systems. This course will also facilitate understanding of the terminology associated with the human body.

Through practice and reflection, learners nuture personal and professional relationships using interpersonal communication skills. With a focus on other-oriented communication, learners demonstrate how inequities and power dynamics influence relationships.

This introductory course explores the role of play in children's development and how play is integral to a child's developmental needs. Students explore the relationship of play to the different developmental stages, as well as the role of the environment and the early childhood educator in enhancing children's play. This course focuses on the planning of inclusive and appropriate play environments including indoor and outdoor play experiences. Learners explore a variety of play situations and materials used in
childcare settings.

Through the lens of cultural context, this course provides an understanding of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory and its relationship to social-emotional wellbeing. Learners inform and modify curriculum experiences through observation, documentation, and reflection to model learning environments that support the social-emotional development of children. Support strategies to foster social-emotional development and respectful cooperative relationships with children, family and community are developed.

This first-year composition course introduces learners to academic writing and critical thinking. They read and analyze sociopolitical, cultural, and gender issues in texts with an emphasis on experiences of people whose voices were historically silenced, particularly those of Indigenous communities in Canada. Learners develop strategies to communicate their own ideas and integrate them with those of others by quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing source material. Learners present their written assignments professionally according to APA formatting guidelines.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of human growth and development and typical behavioural responses throughout the lifespan. You will analyze human development across four domains: physical, cognitive, social, and emotional. Emphasis is placed upon the stages of development and their linkage to common events occurring during these stages.

This course is an introduction to Indigenous cultural experience and perspectives. Learners analyze the foundations for stereotypes, bias and false narratives that impact Indigenous ways of being in Canada. Learners consider how legal and social policy impacts Indigenous identity. Euro-Canadian perspectives and beliefs toward Indigenous people are discussed. Learners explore the experience and Indigenous worldview in the Canadian context.

In this course, learners explore how families are integrated within larger social systems; how patterns of social power and inequality shape Canadian families; as well as how and why the family is critical to the socialization process. The course culminates in the critical assessment of issues affecting families in Canada.

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  • If you are currently studying in a post-secondary program at BVC, please register for your courses via mybvc to ensure your enrolments and fees are processed appropriately.
  • Cart total based on domestic tuition rates. For information about International Tuition rates please see Additional Fees Apply
  • If you anticipate applying for a student loan, your payment will be refunded to you based on your loan award once your funding has been received by BVC.

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