• Print
  • Share
 
 

Business Administration Diploma

Description: The Business Administration Diploma prepares you for a wide variety of in-demand career opportunities by developing key business skills and knowledge that employers are looking for. The program curriculum offers various innovative approaches to learning including seminars, expert guest speakers, case analyses, online business simulations, external consulting projects, and experiential excursions.

Time Commitment: This is a two year (4 terms / 60 weeks total) Diploma program. A full course load per semester includes 5 courses. Students may elect to take fewer courses each semester; however it will take longer to complete the program.

Online Option: All common Year One courses are available online, and many courses in Year Two are also available online.


Courses in Program

Program Breakdown: This Diploma program consists of foundation courses to build a practical grounding in general business skills and knowledge. Students choose from the following majors to further develop their business expertise on a business path that is best suited for them. Students must declare their major before applying to graduate. Majors include:

Please review course availability when putting together your schedule. Courses may be taken in any order subject to availability and pre-requisite completion.

Download the program breakdown schedule. 

Semester dates and other important dates: Important Dates

Note that the last day for Fall Term is December 19, 2017 for all Chiu School of Business programs. 

FOUNDATION COURSES

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I (3 credits) STUDENTS PRIOR TO FALL 2017*

This course covers fundamental accounting principles and concepts, including the full accounting cycle; accounting for sales and purchases of merchandise; cash control procedure; and valuation of inventories. Other topics include financial statement and worksheet preparation. The course will focus on accounting practices as they apply to small business and sole proprietorship, with an emphasis placed on integrating the basic concepts of accounting.

Available:
In-class: No longer available
Online: Spring 2017 & Fall 2017 Terms only (current students only)

Prerequisite(s):
None

Please note: For all new students starting Fall 2017, this course has been replaced with ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting and will generally be available in-class and online for the fall, winter and spring semesters.

ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 credits) NEW STUDENTS FALL 2017*

In the business environment, accounting and financial information are essential for internal and external decision-making. Therefore, understanding the basics of accounting and financial statements are important for every business graduate. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of accounting with an emphasis on decision-makers' objectives and use of financial information. Key concepts explored include accounting principles and standards, the complete accounting cycle, recording and reporting business transactions, and preparing and analyzing financial statements.

Generally Available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Learners with credit in both ACCT1101 and ACCT1102 are not eligible for credit in ACCT1103.

HRES1101 - Organizational Behaviour (3 credits)*

The study of what people think, feel, and do in and around organizations is key to the search for best practice methods and organizational effectiveness. Throughout this course, we will focus on human behavior from an individual, group, and organization perspective while analyzing key elements which influence human behavior and thinking. In addition to the theory component, students will also have an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills through group work, discussion, research, and personal reflection.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management (3 credits)*

Learners are introduced to concepts, terms, and theories which provide an understanding of the principles of management. Key functions of management, including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, are addressed. The exploration of key functional areas assists learners in developing their own managerial practice. Learners are informed of the vital role a manager plays in an organization.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1201 - Business Communication (3 credits)*

This course covers the theory and practice of effective communication. The course will emphasize class participation through discussion boards, professional conduct, problem-solving and critical thinking as it relates to the communication process. Topics covered will include the importance of psychological factors of communication, clear and concise communication in the workplace, multicultural and nonverbal communication, effective listening and feedback, speaking effectively and efficiently, and the role of conflict management.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1302 - Computer Applications (3 credits)*

This course is a general orientation to pre-packaged software programs and their application to the business environment and to Windows and some of the system utilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1401 - Microeconomics (3 credits)*

Economics is concerned with human behavior and the improvement of society.  The relationship between supply and demand and the scarcity of resources forces consumers to make choices. How do individuals make the best choices to maximize their satisfaction? Microeconomics is about choices and trade-offs, and how firms and individuals interact in markets. How do we make sense of those interactions for our own use in business or as wage earners?

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Blended: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics (3 credits)*

This course will cover business uses of math and algebra with specific topics including percentages; ratios, proportions and currency exchange; merchandise mathematics; break-even and cost-volume-profit analysis; simple interest; compound interest including present and future value, annuities, loans, and mortgages.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1601 - Business Law (3 credits) [Online Only]*

A basic understanding of key elements of the law is an essential factor in successful business management. Learners apply legal fundamentals useful in today's fast-paced, rapidly changing business environment.

Generally available:
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)*

Learners are introduced to concepts aimed at providing a solid foundation of marketing principles and the role marketing plays in business. Emphasizing a holistic approach, learners have the opportunity to analyze and apply the marketing mix. Key concepts include product, price, placement, and promotion (4Ps), the Integrated Marketing Communications Mix (IMC), market research, and consumer behaviour. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Plus 1 Elective Course

Return to Top


MAJORS

Accounting

Business Diploma graduates with a major in Accounting gain a broad understanding of business with a focus on the development of job ready, technical accounting skills, soft skills, and other related business abilities needed for success in the accounting field. Graduates typically find employment as accounting technicians, bookkeepers, accounts payable/receivable clerks, financial analysts, internal or external auditors, or in a variety of other entry-level accounting positions. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Accounting Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following:

ACCT2301 - Taxation (3 credits) (Prerequisite: ACCT 1102)

This course covers income taxation in Canada, including the theoretical and practical concepts of income tax and the preparation of income tax returns. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and rules of the Canadian Income Tax Act pertaining to the determination of personal income tax payable. Specific topics include the following: employment income, business income, property income, capital gains and losses, other income and deductions, computation of taxable income and taxes payable for individuals.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II  OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting  

ACCT2101 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I (3 credits)

Building and expanding on accounting knowledge explored during introductory financial accounting, this course takes an in-depth examination of the current accounting principles, practices, and standards for both public and private corporate financial presentation and reporting. The course concepts focus on assets reported in the statement of financial position and the related income effects and results.  Learners apply accounting standards to various business transactions and build professional judgment and decision-making capabilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II  (with a C+ minimum) OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting (with a C+ minimum) 

ACCT2102 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II (3 credits)

This course continues to examine the complexities of current accounting principles and standards for both public and private corporate financial presentation, with a focus on liabilities and equities. Topics covered include current and long-term liabilities, leases, accounting for income taxes, pensions and other employee benefit plans, complex debt and equity instruments, basic and diluted earnings per share, shareholder’s equity, accounting changes, and analysis of financial statements.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms (2018) 

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT2101 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

ACCT2201 - Management Accounting I (3 credits)

This course explores the concepts of managerial accounting consisting of the key fundamentals for planning, controlling, and measuring operations. The course topics generally focus on short-term management decision making and the techniques, methods, and systems of performance reporting and evaluation used to assist management in these decisions. Learners explore a variety of costing systems, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting, and variance analysis which are essential to understanding business operations and developing critical thinking and problem-solving capabilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting  (with a C+ minimum in either course)

ACCT2202 - Management Accounting II (3 credits)

This course delves deeper and expands the examination of the field of managerial accounting. Both short-term and long-term management decision-making are examined and topics include pricing decisions; the balanced scorecard and product profitability; customer profitability; process costing; spoilage, scrap and rework; cost allocations; joint and by-product costing; inventory planning, control and costing; long-term investment decisions and capital budgeting; transfer pricing and other control systems and performance measurements used in reporting for control.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT2201 - Management Accounting I

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

The focus of finance is on the increasing value of the firm as measured by the market value of the share price. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting 

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)*

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2501 - Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)*

This course explores the basic techniques and tools of statistical analysis and interpretation used in the business environment. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics


Plus 1 of the following courses:

MGMT2301 - Microsoft Excel (3 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive presentation of Microsoft Excel. The course will begin with a review of the basic Excel topics presented in MGMT 1302 before new topics are introduced. New topics include charting, formatting worksheets, absolute cell references, working with large worksheets, what-if analysis, worksheet database manipulation, lookup functions, database functions, templates, and working with multiple worksheets and workbooks.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s): 

MGMT1302 - Computer Applications

MGMT2302 - Computerized Accounting for Management (3 credits)*

Many businesses use computerized accounting systems to provide accurate and timely financial data needed for effective decision-making. This course uses a practical approach to introduce learners to the features, functions, and capabilities of an integrated accounting software package. Learners use the software and their accounting knowledge to create and maintain accounting records for all activities in the accounting cycle. Sage 50 Accounting software is used, and the knowledge gained can be applied to other computerized accounting systems.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

Return to Top


Digital Marketing

This program combines the fields of business, marketing, technology and digital media communications and prepares learners to market an organization or product using the latest digital marketing tools and techniques. Building on the foundation year, the Digital Marketing major focuses on user experience design practice, marketing analytics, integrated media strategies, and web development techniques. 

Requirements: A laptop computer meeting minimum specifications is required for this major including:

  • Intel quad core CPU (i5 or i7)
  • 8GB RAM (16GB recommended)
  • 13" 1080p screen (15" recommended)
  • Dedicated graphics card with 2 GB of VRam (4GB recommended)
  • 256GB Solid State hard drive (512GB recommended)
  • Portable Hard Drive (for data backup)
  • Windows 10

         **Equivalent specification in an Apple MacBook Pro is acceptable.

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Digital Marketing Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following:

DESN2301 - User Experience Design (3 credits)

This course introduces the principles of designing the user experience. These principles, as well as design thinking, are applied in the construction of effective solutions to business scenarios. Learners take a multi-disciplinary approach to integrating skills, concepts, and performance criteria within production teams. The course covers marketing content, layouts, usability testing, and visual theory, as well as introduces designing for emerging technologies.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

DESN2202 - Introduction to Digital Media Production (3 credits)

The “image” in interactive design, interface building, and web publishing is central to digital production. This course covers key tools, filters, and layers in the creation and manipulation of images, building foundational skills in the use of creative production software. A combination of photography, typography, drawing, computer graphics, brainstorming techniques, and production methods are addressed, as well as interactive design. Learners explore techniques combining photographic and illustrative material using imaging software to produce digital based visuals, collages, and conceptual mock-ups with both bitmap and vector elements.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

DATA2301 - Fundamentals of Digital Marketing Analytics (3 credits)

In this course, learners apply marketing principles using various digital analytic platforms to address data-driven organizational contexts. Learners analyze sample data sets to draw correlations between consumer behaviour, media, and campaign strategies as the basis for the formal presentation of performance and metrics. These activities lead to the evaluation of types of engagement through the customer lifecycle and how those engagements evolve to address changing consumer behaviour.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

MGMT2102 - Project Management (3 credits)*

Project management is an essential skill contributing to an organisation’s competitive advantage. This course incorporates the global standards from the Project Management Institute. The essential elements of project management include principles of project management, proposal stages, project scheduling, controlling, reporting, and the use of technologies to manage projects.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2303 - Integrated Marketing Communications (3 credits)*

Shifting media consumption trends, global access to digital networks, and rapid adoption of mobile communications have resulted in a rising demand for communicators who can craft cohesive and compelling brand messaging that engage consumers while building brand equity. Learners are exposed to these evolving marketing and communications trends and examine why integrated and ethical communication are critical to an organization and its stakeholders. Integrated marketing communications materials are also evaluated.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG 1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting OR ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I 
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics


Plus 1 of the following courses:

DESN2201 - Introduction to Web Design for Digital Marketing (3 credits)

Websites and website design are important in the field of digital marketing. This course introduces the principles of website design and focusses on usability and design aesthetics. Learners explore trends in web publication and incorporate design considerations like iconography, workflow, graphics, menus, and layout into the production of websites that address business needs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

SODV2204 - Introduction to Web Development for Digital Marketing (3 credits)

In this course, learners create websites by structuring and styling web pages using online tools. During construction, learners link web pages, display graphic images, create menus, format text, and position elements in the production and modification of web pages. Learners also explore the principles of search engine optimization and accessibility.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.


Plus 2 of the following courses:

DESN2201 - Introduction to Web Design for Digital Marketing (3 credits)

Websites and website design are important in the field of digital marketing. This course introduces the principles of website design and focusses on usability and design aesthetics. Learners explore trends in web publication and incorporate design considerations like iconography, workflow, graphics, menus, and layout into the production of websites that address business needs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

SODV2204 - Introduction to Web Development for Digital Marketing (3 credits)

In this course, learners create websites by structuring and styling web pages using online tools. During construction, learners link web pages, display graphic images, create menus, format text, and position elements in the production and modification of web pages. Learners also explore the principles of search engine optimization and accessibility.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

Note:
Additional course applicable software may be required.

PREL2101 - Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)*

With mainstream adoption of the Internet, instant access to information, and the ability to provide public online feedback, the field of public relations (PR) is evolving. Learners are introduced to the evolving practice of PR through consideration of its fundamentals and how organizations use PR to build mutually beneficial relationships with its publics. Learners also examine how organizations effectively respond to a crisis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2103 - PR & Digital Media (3 credits)

Combining traditional public relations (PR) best practices with digital media offers organizations new ways to build relationships, share information, and manage reputation. Learners have the opportunity to explore how the field has evolved and why organizations must leverage digital communication to reach its publics. Learners also explore the principles, forms, and creation of digital media and the connections between PR, digital media, and integrated marketing communications.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2104 - Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)

In PR you need more than people skills to succeed - you need to be able to write and develop various types of PR collateral such as blogs, web copy, social media posts, news releases, op-eds, articles, speeches and more. Writing effectively, the delivery and the timing of the message to the target audience can be the key to successful communication for any organization. This course covers the various forms of public relations writing and their application whether trying to persuade or inform the media, the public, employees or shareholders. Students learn how to write clearly, concisely, and persuasively while working under tight deadlines and editing their work and the work of others.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT 1201 - Business Communication (with a B+ minimum)

PREL2202 - Communication Research & Planning (3 credits)

Research, research, research. This is one of the most critical components of planning and evaluation for public relations professional. In this course, students will learn why research is recommended for public relations, when it is required, what information is needed and how data is collected. Various research topics will be examined such as qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, and formal and information research methods. Students will learn how to distinguish and recognize various PR research instruments and metrics, including media monitoring, communications audits, focus groups, interviewing, opinion polls and surveys to plan and evaluate various public relations campaigns including social media campaigns. Students get an opportunity to conduct their own research in order to build a Communications plan following the RACE formula.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2204 - Building and Maintaining Stakeholder Relations (3 credits)

Stakeholders have an enormous impact on an organization’s mission and objectives. Therefore, it is important to learn who your stakeholders are and know how to build and maintain mutually beneficial relations. This course includes an examination of strategies and tactics on how a public relations professional develops communications plan to build, manage and sustain relations with stakeholders, including the media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2101 - Consumer Behaviour (3 credits)

This course is an advanced marketing course designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of consumer behaviour, with emphasis on the consumer in the marketplace, consumers as individuals, consumers as decision makers, and consumers as influenced by culture and subculture. An examination of consumer behaviour theories and research will be a key component of this course. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the application of consumer behaviour concepts in a competitive, dynamic, and global business environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG 1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG 1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2302 - Advertising (3 credits)*

This course covers the role of advertising within the marketing communications mix. Topics include key themes such as consumer behavior concepts; target marketing; strategic planning; the integrated marketing mix; media and sending the message; design and layout of advertisements; and creative planning.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study of effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

Plus 1 Elective Course

Return to Top


Event Management

Gain a broad understanding of the behind the scene aspects that will help future event professionals plan and produce outstanding events. With a focus on exceeding client and attendee expectations, this program covers research, planning, coordinating and managing successful events. Graduates typically find employment as event coordinators with special event/entertainment companies, in hotels or convention centres, as wedding planners, and a variety of not-for-profit and corporate businesses.

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.

In order to complete the Event Management Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling and Ethics (3 credits)*

This course encompasses the principles of delivering an exceptional customer experience to increase customer retention, loyalty, and sales. In addition, there is an emphasis on delivering a consistent sales presentation to close sales and handle customer objections. Learners are provided an opportunity to develop key skills to handle customer problems while developing relationships and uncovering needs to increase sales opportunities. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2103 - PR & Digital Media (3 credits)

Combining traditional public relations (PR) best practices with digital media offers organizations new ways to build relationships, share information, and manage reputation. Learners have the opportunity to explore how the field has evolved and why organizations must leverage digital communication to reach its publics. Learners also explore the principles, forms, and creation of digital media and the connections between PR, digital media, and integrated marketing communications.

Generally available:

In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2201 - Introduction to Fundraising (3 credits)

Many organizations, either charitable or not-for-profit look to raise money every year to fulfill their mission. This course offers an insight into special events from the charitable perspective and provides an understanding of how fundraising and the processes involved can work in any community campaign. Instruction will cover basic fund-raising concepts including skills and techniques that ensure the self-sufficiency and long-term growth of a non-profit or a charitable organization. Learners will understand the requirements of making an event successful in the non-profit sector. Finally, learners will build knowledge in fund development strategies and activities within the context of special events. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2204 - Building & Maintaining Stakeholder Relations (3 credits)

Stakeholders have an enormous impact on an organization’s mission and objectives. Therefore, it is important to learn who your stakeholders are and know how to build and maintain mutually beneficial relations. This course includes an examination of strategies and tactics on how a public relations professional develops communications plan to build, manage and sustain relations with stakeholders, including the media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism (3 credits)*

This course defines the tourism industry and how all industry groups work together to meet the needs and expectations of the visitor. The course will focus on the impact and contributions to the economy by the tourism industry.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occur in order to create and produce well organized and well-managed events. It involves the effective procurement, organization and implementation of all the products, services and service providers that will bring an event to life. As a professional event planner, you must have an understanding of the role and scope of event management as it is practiced in a broad variety of event contexts. Whether you are creating and coordinating celebrations, conferences, fundraisers, expositions, corporate hospitality events, award galas, fashion shows, mitzvahs, grand opening, familiarization tours or incentive trips, you must be familiar with the tasks required to perform the complex responsibilities associated with their design, planning and production. This course will examine techniques and procedures required for producing successful and sustainable events of all types and sizes.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2202 - Meetings, Expositions & Conventions (3 credits)

For as long as there have been people, there have been meetings and despite rising costs for transportation and hospitality services, more and more meetings are being held in today's fast-paced environment. Meetings, Exhibitions and Conventions introduces you to the scope, diversity and changing aspects of this growing and profitable sector within the tourism industry. Examining the major players and components that make up a convention and/or exhibition, students will gain insights into the workings of this sector. Instruction is provided on processes and techniques for producing successful event gatherings including planning and design elements of meetings, exhibitions and conventions. Finally, students explore new technologies that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of critical elements included in the meeting planner's responsibilities. 

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2203 - Creating the Event Experience (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occur in order to create and produce well-organized and well-managed events. The event professional must look at an event as an entire production, similar to a theatrical production, focusing on what the attendee will see and hear during the event. We will look at determining what it is the client wants and needs to achieve, in order to select the most appropriate décor, the right effects and specific equipment for the job based on the resources available. In this course, we will concentrate on working with the necessary suppliers to create an environment with a purpose, the desired message and a legacy of memories. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management

TOUR2204 - Catered Events (3 credits)

Whether your event is on a mountain top, at the beach, in a garden, or a corporate hotel, as a skilled event planner you have to be competent at developing the right menu and catering services to make your client's event a success. Catered Events focuses on the fundamentals of the business and the craft of catering for events. You will be introduced to the catering contract and examines various negotiation techniques. You will also explore menu-planning, styles of service, room setups and staff requirements for different types of functions. Instruction is provided on creating menus to match clients' budgets and on how to plan a deep-market themed event. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Financial Services

As a financial professional, this program prepares you in the areas of financial planning, principles and industry standards, financial products and services, tax and legal implications, managing risks, and building customer service expertise. Graduates typically find employment in financial institutions, entering positions such as customer service representative; banking, credit or other investment management position; finance and insurance clerks; insurance and real estate clerks; supervisors in sales and services; or investment professionals. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Financial Services Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

ACCT2301 - Taxation (3 credits)

This course covers income taxation in Canada, including the theoretical and practical concepts of income tax and the preparation of income tax returns. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and rules of the Canadian Income Tax Act pertaining to the determination of personal income tax payable. Specific topics include the following: employment income, business income, property income, capital gains and losses, other income and deductions, computation of taxable income and taxes payable for individuals.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

FNSR2101 - Introduction to Insurance (3 credits)*

In this course, through the examination of how insurance is used to manage risk, learners explore the laws, concepts and practices commonly encountered in the insurance industry. History and development of insurance worldwide are examined with a focus on Canadian law and practice.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

The focus of finance is on increasing value of the firm as measured by the market value of the share price. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

FNSR2301 - Financial Markets & Products (3 credits)

This course introduces the concept of money, the Canadian financial industry, the impact of the economic and regulatory environment and the analysis of products and services available to customers, including the adjudication of credit. These concepts provide the basis for the financial planning process and are eligible for Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Core Curriculum.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2302 - Personal Financial Planning l (3 credits)

In this course, learners have an opportunity to gain a technical understanding of personal financial planning. Concepts include elements which impact an individual or family's financial well-being. The process of collecting and analyzing required information to begin the financial planning process are examined. This course prepares learners with fundamental financial planning knowledge and is eligible for Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Core Curriculum.

Generally available:
In-class:  Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2303 - Investment Funds in Canada (3 credits)

This course covers the financial and mutual fund industries. Topics include mutual fund and investment products, the regulatory system governing the mutual fund industry, and acceptable selling practices and processes. To complete this course, learners must write the Canadian Investment Funds Course (CIFC) final exam. Upon successful completion of the exam, learners will meet the proficiency requirements of the provincial securities commission for mutual fund licensing.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2304 - Personal Financial Planning ll (3 credits)

Using the technical information provided in FNSR2301 Financial Markets and Products and FNSR2302 Personal Financial Planning I, learners have the opportunity for practical application of personal financial planning. The focus of the course is on evaluating customer needs and applying the financial planning process and practices to provide appropriate recommendations. This course is eligible for Certified Financial Planning (CFP) Core Curriculum. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
FNSR2301 - Financial Markets and Products
FNSR2302 - Personal Financial Planning l

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)*

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling and Ethics (3 credits)*

This course encompasses the principles of delivering an exceptional customer experience to increase customer retention, loyalty, and sales. In addition, there is an emphasis on delivering a consistent sales presentation to close sales and handle customer objections. Learners are provided an opportunity to develop key skills to handle customer problems while developing relationships and uncovering needs to increase sales opportunities. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


General Business

The General Business major is designed to provide students with seamless pathways to further post-secondary studies at various universities in Alberta. Please consult with a Student Engagement Officer if you are planning to transfer to one of Bow Valley College's many post-secondary partners. Graduates with a major in General Business gain a broad understanding of a multitude of business concepts. Graduates typically find employment in various sectors including financial services, energy, insurance, human resources, manufacturing, not-for-profit, retail, sales, and marketing industries. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the General Business Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following:

General Business Major Courses

Select 9 courses from any of the Business Administration majors and the elective courses:


Plus the following course:

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Global Tourism

The Global Tourism major focuses on the economic importance of tourism worldwide, the importance of sustainable growth practices, and the individual tourism sectors which when combined, create this dynamic, fast-growing industry. Tourism specific knowledge is applied to business courses examining marketing, branding, relationship selling, communication, revenue management and product development. Graduates typically find employment in the diverse field of tourism as destination marketing coordinators, group sales coordinators, incentive travel coordinators, meeting and conventions coordinators, visitor services coordinators, customer service representatives, tourism marketing specialist, or in a variety of other tourism positions. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Global Tourism Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study of effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling & Ethics (3 credits)*

This course encompasses the principles of delivering an exceptional customer experience to increase customer retention, loyalty, and sales. In addition, there is an emphasis on delivering a consistent sales presentation to close sales and handle customer objections. Learners are provided an opportunity to develop key skills to handle customer problems while developing relationships and uncovering needs to increase sales opportunities. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism (3 credits)*

This course defines the tourism industry and how all industry groups work together to meet the needs and expectations of the visitor. The course will focus on the impact and contributions to the economy by the tourism industry.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):

None

TOUR2102 - Human & Regional Geography (3 credits)

This course focuses on the connections and the continuous interplay between features of a place, populations, resources, cultures, and political systems. Human activities, natural processes, and their interaction with landscapes will also be covered.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2103 - Global Product Development (3 credits)

This course will cover effective processes for generating product ideas and examining general demand factors and trends, travel motivation and market segmentation. Destination development and emerging non-traditional destinations will also be examined.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2104 - Sustainable Tourism Management (3 credits)

The rapid growth of tourism on a global scale has resulted in significant negative environmental impacts, and there is increasing concern about the relationship between tourism and the environment, both natural and cultural. This course will explore the challenges facing the tourism industry in attempting to create a balance between environmental and economic concerns. The importance of "greening" of the industry will be examined.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2202 - Meetings, Expositions & Conventions (3 credits)

For as long as there have been people, there have been meetings and today despite rising costs for transportation and hospitality services more and more meetings are being held. Meetings, Expositions and Conventions introduces you to the scopes, diversity and changing aspects of this sector of the tourism industry which continues to grow and be a profitable market segment. We examine the major players and components that make up a convention and/or exposition to gain insights into the workings of this sector. We learn about processes and techniques for producing successful event gatherings and plan and design elements of meetings, expositions and conventions. Finally, we explore new technologies that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of critical elements of the meeting planner’s work.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2999 - Advanced Global Tourism (3 credits)

This project-based course will provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate all skills and abilities utilizing knowledge gained in the Introduction to Global Tourism, human and regional geography, international business, global product development, sustainable tourism, management, marketing, and college-wide learning outcomes through an individual project. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Human Resources

The focus of the Human Resource major is on aligning the workforce with the strategic direction of the organization and includes and introduction to the function of human resources, and in-depth learning on recruitment and selection, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety, employment law, and labour relations. Graduates typically find employment in entry-level human resource or administrative positions within public or private industries, client service organizations or entrepreneurial opportunities. Career development and advanced post-secondary opportunities will be driven by the individual. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Human Resources Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources (3 credits)*

This course focusses on the importance of aligning human resource practices with organizational strategies and employment legislative acts. Through an exploration of workforce planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, learning and development, performance management, total rewards and recognition, learners reflect on the process of recruiting and retaining employees to achieve an engaged workforce. Trend analysis includes discussion on workplace health and safety.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2202 - Recruitment & Selection (3 credits)*

This course examines how to create and sustain an effective recruitment and selection program. The framework focusses on the alignment of the organizational strategy with the recruitment and selection processes. Learners formulate plans based on a  workforce plan and apply the five steps to various business scenarios. Learners assess evaluation techniques and performance management as methods of employee retention. Trend analysis includes changes to recruitment and selection with social media.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources

HRES2203 - Compensation & Benefits (3 credits)*

This course focusses on the total rewards package that includes compensation, benefits, and monetary or non-monetary rewards. The importance of aligning the organizational strategy with the total rewards package forms the foundation for this human resource functional area. Alberta legislative acts are researched. Practical experience with the process of job evaluation and connecting performance standards to the compensation plan are explained. Trends in compensation are researched. 

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Term
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources

HRES2301 - Employment Law (3 credits)*

This course examines the legal rights, responsibilities and obligations of employers and employees within the workplace. A framework of employment law is reviewed throughout the recruiting, hiring, performance managing, promoting and the terminating of employees. Laws pertaining to Human Rights, Employment Standards, Workers' Compensation, Equity in the Workplace and Privacy are researched, as human resource professionals must learn to assess risks and to evaluate options that reduce potential liability. Trends are analyzed about social media in the workplace.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2302 - Labour Relations (3 credits)*

Labour Relations examines the history of industrial relations and unions within Canada and, specifically, analyzes union-management roles and relationships within the Alberta workplace. Learners explore the role of human resources within a union environment and the relationship with key stakeholders such as unions, employees, employers, and governments. The collective bargaining process, which includes the negotiation of articles within a collective agreement, is reviewed. An exploration of trend analysis will include changes in workplace demographics, work arrangements, and globalization.  

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2303 - Occupational Health & Safety (3 credits)*

This course examines legislative acts, builds engagement within the workforce on the importance of health and safety as well as identifies hazards that exist in the workplace. Creation and evaluation of training programs are presented to increase the importance of health and safety in the workplace. Wellness, disability management and return to work programs are reviewed. The focus is on the trends that are emerging in the workplace, which include bullying. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)*

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study of effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international businesses. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organization's normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen the actual damage, and protect the organization's reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Insurance & Risk Management

The Insurance and Risk Management major focuses on a structured approach to managing uncertainty due to threats that may emerge from the environment, technology, humans, organizations, or politics. Graduates gain the knowledge and skills to reduce these defined risks and to manage the uncertainty to an acceptable level. Employment opportunities for graduates are generally available in pure risk management positions or in positions in the related fields of general insurance, business, continuity, and occupational health and safety, and in a wide range of other positions in which a portion of the job involves risk management activities.

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online  

In order to complete the Insurance & Risk Management Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following:

Note: This program has been revised. For students who started prior to September 2015, please follow the former program course list attached. 

FNSR2201 - Introduction to Insurance (3 credits)*

In this course, through the examination of how insurance is used to manage risk, learners explore the laws, concepts, and practices commonly encountered in the insurance industry. History and development of insurance worldwide are examined with a focus on Canadian law and practice.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

The focus of finance is on increasing value of the firm as measured by the market value of the share price. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

FNSR2401 - Risk Management Principles & Practice (3 credits)

This course provides students with a broad understanding of risk management and the risk management process.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation students must achieve 70% on a two-hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional fee for each exam. For more information on the CRM designation, click here. 

FNSR2104 - Automobile Insurance (3 credits)

This course is a study of Canadian automobile insurance, its legislation, policies, and regulations. With an overview of different provincial approaches to automobile insurance, learners examine in detail owner's policies and coverages specific to Alberta and focus on personal coverages. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2103 - Insurance Against Liability (3 credits)

To understand liability insurance, learners must understand the law and the Canadian legal system as well as the differences between the common law and the Civil Code of Quebec. Learners are introduced to legal principles that affect liability insurance. Insurance against liability examines some of the more common ways people become liable and explains how this liability may or may not be insured. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2102 - Insurance on Property (3 credits)

This course is the foundation for all types of property insurance. Explanations of the principles, doctrines, and characteristics are included. The course demonstrates the legislative framework reflected in common commercial and personal lines insurance policies. Learners explore how legislation develops in response to new and changing practical problems.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2402 - Risk Assessment & Treatment (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop an enterprise-wide perspective of risk by applying risk management concepts to four major categories: hazard (insurable), operational, financial, and strategic. This course broadens your understanding of risk management from its traditional focus on accidental losses to include all risks an organization may face. Learn about global risk management standards such as ISO 31000 and the COSO ERM – Integrated Framework, and discuss various risk identification and analysis techniques in detail. Apply rudimentary analytical tools to assess financial risk in areas of financial leverage, liquidity risk, and capital investment risk. Risk oversight, monitoring, and assurance are discussed from the perspective of governance and internal control. This course relies heavily on insurance based content consistent with risk assessment and risk management principles.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation students must achieve 70% on a two-hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional fee for each exam. For more information on the CRM designation, click here. 

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics


Plus 2 courses from the following:

FNSR2105 - Essentials of Loss Adjusting (3 credits)

In the context of automobile, property, and liability claims, this course focuses on interpersonal skills and knowledge to help learners develop claims-handling techniques. The process of policy analysis for coverage evaluation including investigation, negotiation, and settlement is explored. Learners reflect on managing relationships to gather critical information.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2106 - Underwriting Essentials (3 credits)

Taking the role of an underwriter, learners analyze individual property, liability, and automobile risks. The course begins with an overview of the underwriter's role as an investor of shareholder capital on behalf of the insurer. Learners examine how the underwriter role has evolved. The course covers an underwriter as a risk assessor and explores the technical and interpersonal skills needed to succeed.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2107 - Essential Skills for Brokers & Agent (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of insurance business practices from the broker's perspective with a focus on the needs of personal lines clients and small commercial risks.  The learner, as an insurance intermediary, is given insight into the skills needed to perform effectively.  Following the process of risk from evaluation through to documentation, learners review the major product lines and common policy transactions a broker executes.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2403 - Risk Financing (3 credits)

This course will assess the methods which an organization can obtain funds to pay for accidental losses. Emphasis is placed on the selection, implementation, and monitoring of various risk financing techniques. Specific subjects discussed are: a framework for risk financing; criteria for risk financing selection techniques; insurance as a mechanism for financing property, net income, personnel, and liability losses; accounting and income tax aspects of accidental losses; insurance pricing; selection of insurers and their representatives; implementing risk retention available options, including the use of affiliated insurers; and cost of risk allocation techniques.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation, students must achieve 70% on a two-hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional fee for each exam. For more information on the CRM designation, click here. 

MGMT2102 - Project Management (3 credits)*

Project management is an essential skill contributing to an organisation's competitive advantage. This course incorporates the global standards from the Project Management Institute. The essential elements of project management include principles of project management, proposal stages, project scheduling, controlling, reporting, and the use of technologies to manage projects.

Generally available:

In-Class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2301 - Microsoft Excel (3 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive presentation of Microsoft Excel. The course will begin with a review of the basic Excel topics presented in MGMT 1302 before new topics are introduced. New topics include charting, formatting worksheets, absolute cell references, working with large worksheets, what-if analysis, worksheet database manipulation, lookup functions, database functions, templates, and working with multiple worksheets and workbooks.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1302 - Computer Applications

MGMT 2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)*

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2501 - Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)*

This course covers the basic techniques and tools of statistical analysis and interpretation. Emphasis is placed on examples that occur in, or relate to, the business environment. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and methods of time series analysis. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math

Attain the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation that demonstrates a level of professional commitment, knowledge, and skills that employers in both public and private sectors recognize. The CRM designation is a widely recognized qualification that provides risk managers a foundation of knowledge and skills needed to identify, assess, monitor and limit risks. Find out more here.

Return to Top


Marketing

Business Diploma graduates with a major in Marketing gain a working knowledge of how to create and foster value, create a point of differentiation and how to communicate that value to the marketplace. Graduates will also acquire knowledge in the areas of public relations, event coordination and fundraising making this a comprehensive specialization. Graduates typically find employment in event-level marketing and advertising as marketing assistants, account coordinators, marketing analysts, sales representatives, and marketing account executives. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Marketing Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MKTG2101 - Consumer Behaviour (3 credits)

This course is an advanced marketing course designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of consumer behaviour, with emphasis on the consumer in the marketplace, consumers as individuals, consumers as decision makers, and consumers as influenced by culture and subculture. An examination of consumer behaviour theories and research will be a key component of this course. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the application of consumer behaviour concepts in a competitive, dynamic, and global business environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2221 - Professional Selling and Ethics (3 credits)*

This course encompasses the principles of delivering an exceptional customer experience to increase customer retention, loyalty, and sales. In addition, there is an emphasis on delivering a consistent sales presentation to close sales and handle customer objections. Learners are provided an opportunity to develop key skills to handle customer problems while developing relationships and uncovering needs to increase sales opportunities. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2101 - Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)*

With mainstream adoption of the Internet, instant access to information, and the ability to provide public online feedback, the field of public relations (PR) is evolving. Learners are introduced to the evolving practice of PR through consideration of its fundamentals and how organizations use PR to build mutually beneficial relationships with its publics. Learners also examine how organizations effectively respond to a crisis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organization's normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen the actual damage, and protect the organization's reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2201 - Introduction to Fundraising (3 credits)

Many organizations, either charitable or not-for-profit look to raise money every year to fulfill their mission. This course offers an insight into special events from the charitable perspective and provides an understanding of how fundraising and the processes involved can work in any community campaign. Instruction will cover basic fund-raising concepts including skills and techniques that ensure the self-sufficiency and long-term growth of a non-profit or a charitable organization. Learners will understand the requirements of making an event successful in the non-profit sector. Finally, learners will build knowledge in fund development strategies and activities within the context of special events. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2202 - Communication Research & Planning (3 credits)

Research, research, research. This is one of the most critical components of planning and evaluation for public relations professional. In this course, students will learn why research is recommended for public relations, when it is required, what information is needed and how data is collected. Various research topics will be examined such as qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, and formal and information research methods. Students will learn how to distinguish and recognize various PR research instruments and metrics, including media monitoring, communications audits, focus groups, interviewing, opinion polls and surveys to plan and evaluate various public relations campaigns including social media campaigns. Students get an opportunity to conduct their own research in order to build a Communications plan following the RACE formula.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occur in order to create and produce well organized and well-managed events. It involves the effective procurement, organization, and implementation of all the products, services and service providers that will bring an event to life. As a professional event planner, you must have an understanding of the role and scope of event management as it is practiced in a broad variety of event contexts. Whether you are creating and coordinating celebrations, conferences, fundraisers, expositions, corporate hospitality events, award galas, fashion shows, mitzvahs, grand openings, familiarization tours or incentive trips, you must be familiar with the tasks required to perform the complex responsibilities associated with their design, planning, and production. This course will examine techniques and procedures required for producing successful and sustainable events of all types and sizes.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Plus 1 Elective Course

Return to Top


Public Relations

Business Diploma graduates with a major in Public Relations (PR) will gain a broad understanding of the communications field while building technical expertise, strategic thinking and communication management skills through various research projects and media platforms (electronic, print, and related technology). PR is a diverse and exciting profession that directly influences change and aligns an organization's brand and reputation. 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Public Relations Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study of effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling & Ethics (3 credits)*

This course encompasses the principles of delivering an exceptional customer experience to increase customer retention, loyalty, and sales. In addition, there is an emphasis on delivering a consistent sales presentation to close sales and handle customer objections. Learners are provided an opportunity to develop key skills to handle customer problems while developing relationships and uncovering needs to increase sales opportunities. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Term
Online: Fall, Winter and Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2101 - Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)*

With mainstream adoption of the Internet, instant access to information, and the ability to provide public online feedback, the field of public relations (PR) is evolving. Learners are introduced to the evolving practice of PR through consideration of its fundamentals and how organizations use PR to build mutually beneficial relationships with its publics. Learners also examine how organizations effectively respond to a crisis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms (2018)

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organization's normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen the actual damage, and protect the organization's reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2103 - PR & Digital Media (3 credits)

Combining traditional public relations (PR) best practices with digital media offers organizations new ways to build relationships, share information, and manage reputation. Learners have the opportunity to explore how the field has evolved and why organizations must leverage digital communication to reach its publics. Learners also explore the principles, forms, and creation of digital media and the connections between PR, digital media, and integrated marketing communications.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2104 - Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)

In PR you need more than people skills to succeed - you need to be able to write and develop various types of PR collateral such as blogs, web copy, social media posts, news releases, op-eds, articles, speeches and more. Writing effectively. the delivery and the timing of a message to the target audience can be the key to successful communication for any organization. This course covers the various forms of public relations writing and their application whether trying to persuade or inform the media, the public, employees or shareholders. Students learn how to write clearly, concisely, and persuasively. Working under tight deadlines and editing their work and the work of others is also focused upon. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1201 Business Communication (with a B+ minimum)

PREL2202 - Communication Research & Planning (3 credits)

Research, research, research. This is one of the most critical components of planning and evaluation for public relations professional. In this course, students will learn why research is recommended for public relations, when it is required, what information is needed and how data is collected. Various research topics will be examined such as qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, and formal and information research methods. Students will learn how to distinguish and recognize various PR research instruments and metrics, including media monitoring, communications audits, focus groups, interviewing, opinion polls and surveys to plan and evaluate various public relations campaigns including social media campaigns. Students get an opportunity to conduct their own research in order to build a Communications plan following the RACE formula.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2204 - Building & Maintaining Stakeholder Relations (3 credits)

Stakeholders have an enormous impact on an organization’s mission and objectives. Therefore, it is important to learn who your stakeholders are and know how to build and maintain mutually beneficial relations. This course includes an examination of strategies and tactics on how a public relations professional develops a communications plan to build, manage and sustain relations with stakeholders, including the media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:

In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Supply Chain Management

Business Diploma graduates with a major in Supply Chain Management gain a broad understanding of various aspects of business operations including sourcing and procurement, logistics and transportation, and inventory management to effectively contribute to the operational efficiency of a company.

This major is pending government approval.

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Supply Chain Management Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

The focus of finance is on increasing value of the firm as measured by the market value of the share price. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics(3 credits)*

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2501 - Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)*

This course covers the basic techniques and tools of statistical analysis and interpretation. Emphasis is placed on examples that occur in, or relate to, the business environment. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and methods of time series analysis. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math

SCMT2101 - Introduction to Supply Chain (3 credits)

Supply chain management (SCM) is the movement of material and information through an integrated processes to provide the highest degree of customer satisfaction at the lowest possible cost while achieving a sustainable competitive advantage. The key building blocks of a supply chain including Logistics, Procurement, and Operations/Execution will be covered. Learners explore the scope of supply chain management and its impact on organizations and will be introduced to the different career opportunities in supply chain management while developing the skills and competencies needed to support the integrated SCM process.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):

None

SCMT2201 - Operations Management l (3 credits)

This course examines the integration of the critical business processes from planning to short-term scheduling. The design and management of products, processes, services and supply chains are accomplished by an organization's operations management function. Topics covered include operations, planning and productivity, capacity and strategy design, process and product designs using industry standards, facility layout and location models, job and staff scheduling, and queuing theory.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

SCMT2401 - Logistics and Transportation (3 credits)

Transportation and logistics offer support to the complete cycle of material flow, from internal control, planning, control of work-in-process, purchasing, shipping, and distribution of the finished product. Whether by air, rail, road, water, cable or pipeline, the mode of transportation should lead to the efficient and effective transportation of material through the supply chain. This course introduces the basic concepts of transportation and logistics. Learners examine the holistic concept of how transportation and logistics support SCM, forecasting, inventory management, the planning process, and the physical flow of goods and services in the supply chain. The concepts of intermodal transportation via land, rail, water, and air will be investigated

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
SCMT2101 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management

SCMT2301 - Procurement (3 credits)

Procurement and Contract Management are central to a company's sustainable development efforts. Purchasing managers need to think strategically about the purchases they make and critically evaluate these purchases in light of the risks and uncertainties of the market place. In Procurement and Contract Management. learners address procurement from a strategic perspective as well as at the operational level understanding the relationship between supply chain management and procurement. Topics covered include procurement process, practices and decisions, procurement and the organization, sourcing, vendor selection, negotiation, contract management, relationship management, and procurement strategy

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
SCMT2101 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management

SCMT2501 - Inventory and Materials Management (3 credits)

For most organizations, inventory is the largest asset on the balance sheet, and minimizing inventory frees up money for use elsewhere in the organization. Materials management addresses techniques to manage inventory in such a way to allow processes or entities in the supply chain to operate interdependently. In this course, learners review the fundamental nature of inventory from a financial, physical, forecasting and operational standpoint. Topics include inventory classification; warehousing; matching supply with demand; tools and methods for managing inventory of items with different demand and supply characteristics; forecasting; just-in-time production; materials requirements planning; and supplier management.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
SCMT2101 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)*

This course covers the fundamentals of business strategy theory and application of the frameworks. Learners integrate the knowledge gained in previous business courses and demonstrate how the various pieces of the business puzzle fit together. Learners explore why the different parts of an organization need to be managed in strategic harmony to meet its goals within its competitive environment. A pragmatic approach to developing a strategic analysis skill set is followed. Learners work in multi-disciplinary teams from across the business majors to focus on building long-term strategies for organizations. 

Generally available:

In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I OR ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Plus 1 of the following: 

MGMT2102 - Project Management (3 credits)*

Project management is an essential skill contributing to an organization's competitive advantage. This course incorporates the global standards from the Project Management Institute. The essential elements of project management include principles of project management, proposal stages, project scheduling, controlling, reporting, and the use of technologies to manage projects.

Generally available:

In-Class: Fall Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study of effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources (3 credits)*

This course focusses on the importance of aligning human resource practices with organizational strategies and employment legislative acts. Through an exploration of workforce planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, learning and development, performance management, total rewards and recognition, learners reflect on the process of recruiting and retaining employees to achieve an engaged workforce. Trend analysis includes discussion on workplace health and safety.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

SCMT2601 - Quality Management (3 credits)

This course will cover concepts of total quality management (TQM), just-in-time (JIT) management and lean management. Methodologies such as Deming, Six Sigma and ISO will be covered, as well as procurement, logistics and transportation. Gain an appreciation of quality concepts and be able to correlate between theory and practical application. Through a mix of theory and practical learning, learners develop an understanding of quality management from a supply chain perspective.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term

Prerequisite(s):
SCMT2101 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management

Return to Top


Elective Courses

Business Administration Diploma electives include courses from any 2000 level courses from any of the Business Administration majors, as well as the following courses:

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

MGMT1102 - Corporate Social Responsibility (3 credits)*

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) articulates an organization's purpose, values, and concerns for society. This course examines concepts and practical approaches successful companies use to integrate CSR strategies with the needs of business and how they evolve their strategies as business needs change.

Generally available:

In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2901 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3 credits)*

This course explores both the creation of an entrepreneurial venture as well as the development of an innovative, entrepreneurial and team approach to business. Learners are challenged to develop an entrepreneurial mindset through engagement in a process that includes identifying entrepreneurial opportunities, testing business model attribute hypotheses, and presenting an entrepreneurial opportunity. Working through this process builds awareness of the experiences an entrepreneur will have in practice.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Term
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2202 - Fundamentals of Financial Management (3 credits)*

This course provides learners with an overview of how non-financial managers use financial information in planning, organizing, evaluating, and decision-making. Key topics include understanding financial information, analyzing financial statements and reports, the role of the finance and accounting department, and how financial information impacts organizational governance.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Terms
Online: Fall Term

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2802 - International Business and Culture (3 credits)

Students will explore strategies for assessing international business opportunities and current market trends while practicing intercultural communication. Collaboration takes place with an international host (based on Bow Valley College International Guidelines), so students apply principles of cultural sensitivity, widen their perspective, and envisage possibilities for international business. Registration is restricted to students selected through an application process. Watch for more information in the D2L news page during the winter term.

Only available:
In-class: Spring Term with travel to an international destination.

ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II (3 credits) STUDENTS PRIOR TO FALL 2017*

Required for students pursuing the Accounting and Financial Services specialization. 

This course covers concepts and principles related to assets, liabilities, and equity with a focus on partnerships and corporations. Topics include accounting for long-term assets including goodwill and intangible assets; current and long-term liabilities; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; partnership and corporation accounting; and cash flow statement preparation and analysis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall 2017 Term only
Online: Fall 2017 & Winter 2018 Terms only. 

Please note: For all new students starting Fall 2017, this course will be replaced with ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting and will generally be available in-class and online for the fall, winter and spring semesters. 

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

Co-operative Education Option

Co-op Education combines academic studies with work-related experience for Business Administration Diploma students in good academic standing. Through an active job search, co-op students bridge their classroom studies with practical, paid experience in their field of study for an entire term (fall, winter, or summer). Acceptance into this non-credit co-op program is competitive and students must complete the application process to be considered. Not all students will be offered a co-op placement. Find more information on the Co-op Option here

Get started. Click on Apply Now